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Blog posts by Lena Gunnarsson

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Lena Gunnarsson is a Swedish dog trainer, instructor and author of the book ”Retrieving for All Occasions”. She has three cocker spaniels and she trains and has competed in field trials, obedience class III, tracking and she also trains scent detection with her dogs. Lena has been training animals for all her life and dogs for the past 18 years. Her experience of training horses, dogs and educating people has taught her quite a lot about the learning process. For almost 20 years she has as an organizational consultant with focus on supporting people to solve problems and encouraging them to take on challenges, which has made her a confident coach. Add the fact that Lena is a journalist, the step to writing “Retrieving for all Occasions” and starting a publishing company - Klickerförlaget Göteborg AB - together with Elsa Blomster was not a big one. At Klickerförlaget they publish books, films and arrange clinics and courses about positive dog training.

Flippa’s first week

From the beginning, there was a puppy that stood out a little extra in all the videos the breeder posted in our little puppy group on Facebook. It was the brown with white paws.It was first to walk, first to get outside the puppy pen, first to find the stairs and...

The recall – the road to freedom

Since the quite cataclysmic Finnish debacle this winter when Quling “did” Finland by hunting and disappearing into the Finnish forests, flushing pheasant after pheasant, hunting like a maniac for 15 minutes completely out of my control, I’ve mostly...

When sports collide

Sometimes I get the question if I am not worried that my different dog sports are going to collide with each other. Am I not running the risk of confusing my dog; won’t it mix up what to do? Tassla and I did done a lot of competitive obedience younger. For a...

“Fika” training

On this blog we have so far been quite good at describing the training we do technically (or at least we try to be good at it). One can almost get the impression that we train and train and like never breathe, as if we never let our dogs take it easy in the training....

Creative distraction training

Simply put, we can say that we make our training more difficult in three ways: By increasing distance or duration and by adding distractions. However, never at the same time. Working with distractions is a way to proof what we’ve trained the dog to do. If we get...
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