+46 70-300 80 99 (weekdays 9 am - 6 pm GMT+2) info@retrievingforalloccasions.com

Theory

Clicker training can sometimes become a bit theoretical and seem much harder than it is. We always encourage our students to plan, try and then evaluate the training and in the practical work we incorporate the theory. The theoretical foundation is often very important for the understanding of clicker training. Here you’ll find our blog posts on the theory behind the clicker philosophy where we in an accessible way explain how we train our dogs and the mumbo-jumbo words that clicker trainers sometimes use.

“Time to prove yourself!”

Imagine that you are taking a class with your dog. Some of the participants are very experienced, others have some experience, someone is completely new to the whole thing, have just begun this training and are new owners of a retrieving breed. Some know each other...

Just laugh it off

One of the most important building blocks in our training philosophy is that we are looking for the good stuff that the dog does so that we can reward that. There’s something a little magical about that, because it rubs off on everything. Suddenly you notice...

Your whistle seems great – can I have it?

I’ve received that question a couple of times when my dogs have sat down really promptly at the stop whistle or responded with lightening speed to the recall whistle. If it had been as simple as selling magic whistles, I’d become rich 😉 , but as we all...

When sports collide

Sometimes I get the question if I am not worried that my different dog sports are going to collide with each other. Am I not running the risk of confusing my dog; won’t it mix up what to do? Tassla and I did done a lot of competitive obedience younger. For a...

Self-control – how much does it cost?

A few years ago, Jenny Nyberg, a neuroscientist at the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at the University of Gothenburg, wrote a very interesting article about what self-control costs. It was published by DogEductus, a Swedish dog training company focusing on...

Creative distraction training

Simply put, we can say that we make our training more difficult in three ways: By increasing distance or duration and by adding distractions. However, never at the same time. Working with distractions is a way to proof what we’ve trained the dog to do. If we get...
%d bloggers like this: